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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)
trading mission was formally approved by eu foreign ministers in brussels -- european union training mission was formally approved. >> citizens are worried involvement could be a long, drawn-out affair like in afghanistan. the point has to be approved by the bundestag later this week. >> french and malian forces engaged in a gunbattle. under a new proposal, german troops would not join them on the front line, but they would provide more logistical support, like using airbus jets to refuel french warplanes mid-air. an additional 150 troops will be needed for this task. several military planes are already being used to transport soldiers. >> we europeans have a strong interest in making sure that a safe haven for global terrorism is not allowed to develop on our doorstep. >> the german cabinet also wants to help train and assess the performance of the malian army. german soldiers will work together with units from other eu countries. >> the army needs to be trained from scratch so they can take over security themselves. we hope this is feasible, but it is a difficult and long-term chal
to provide a voice of the world. last week's european council agreed the overall limit on eu spending for the next seven years, starting in 2014. been agreed in the past, spending has gone up, but last week we agreed that spending should come down. by working with like-minded allies, we delivered a real- terms cut in what brussels can spend for the first time in history. as the house knows, the eu budget is negotiated annually, so what we were negotiating -- initially at the council last november and again last week -- was not the individual annual budgets, but rather the overall framework for the next seven years. this includes the overall ceilings on what can be spent -- effectively, the limit on the european union's credit card for the next seven years. during the last negotiation, which covered the period 2007 to 2013, the last government agreed to an 8% increase in the payments ceiling, to 943 billion. put simply, this gave the eu a credit card with a higher limit, and today we are still living with the results of allowing the eu's big spenders to push for more and more spending
a goal for the european union. after years of very little progress, the e appears to -- the eu appears to have an ally in what has. >> president obama announced the start of trade negotiations on a trade deal. brussels said talks could begin before summer. if successful, those negotiations would result in the biggest financial trade deal ever. >> the eu and u.s. already trade some 2 billion euros worth of goods and services every day. about 1/3 of total global commerce. president obama wants to bring that commerce into what would be the world's biggest free trade zone. the european commission says that would have world wide applications. >> which translates into tens of billions of euros every year and tens of thousands of new jobs. this offers us a great perspective at a time when we are gradually making our way to recovery. most important of all, it is a boost to our economies that does not cost 1 cent of taxpayer money. >> both sides stand to benefit. economists to warn that negotiations will be tough. the eu and washington disagree on issues ranging from industrial trade barriers a
by talking about ordinary europeans getting up and reading about the crisis of confidence in the eu, the lack of transparency and lack of democracy in brussels. he said this inevitably engendered notions like fear and dismay and the solution until frustration -- and frustration, so the real question was how to overcome this kind of emotions. as a former east german dissident, he said there is only one way to overcome those kinds of emotions and that is for people to get involved, to overcome indifference and complacency. on an economic front, it was interesting -- he admitted that germany has profited more than any other european country in the last 10 years of. he said other countries have been complaining about that i am quite an angry shape or form. he said the only question was not a german europe but a europeanized germany. people had high hopes that it would sort of reinvigorate the european mission. gauck has considerable rhetorical capabilities, but it was not a great speech, it was a good speech. it was dutiful. there were fireworks. i do not think he captured anyone's imagination to
today also included plans for a free-trade agreement between the eu and the u.s. kerry also took time out of his schedule to meet with young people in the german capital. >> security lock down as john kerry returned to the city he once called home. the first stop on the visit was for a chat with young berliners. discussions of a different kind with the chancellor. high on their agenda -- foreign policy and the economy, but first these comments on the relationship with the u.s. >> i record a great deal of importance to transatlantic ties. we do not just have common values. we also face common tasks. >> a number of these challenges were discussed at an earlier meeting with kerry's german counterpart. first and foremost, the plans for a new free trade deal between the u.s. and europe. >> germany is our largest trade partner in europe, and we want to see even more trade and investment that will create jobs -- jobs for -- jobs for germans, for americans, for all europeans. >> negotiations are set to begin within months, and i of the two sides managed to overcome their differences, could be
and the eu. >> one of the biggest criticisms of the government spends too much time on politics and not enough addressing the day-to-day economic reality of the people. kind ofrows up, what kosovo will she see? for now, she's just looking forward to a good party. >> today, i am 5. how happy i am. may it live for ever, independence. paul brennan, al-jazeera, kosovo. >> it has been a cold, snowy winter, but this is the perfect time to surf. it brings in a swell for wave riders. we have the story. a trip to the beach in the middle of a south korean winter would not encourage it to her car -- a common sense response -- stay out of the water. unless you are one of a growing band of highly enthusiastic in the area. he has been serving for more than 10 years and years now i coast -- a coach. >> in the summer coming you can swim. there are loads of other things you can do. the waves are
competition and openness in the markets. this is something that is totally in line with the e.u. inspiration of social market economy, and we are lead by, first of all securing the sustainability of public finances in the long-term, including a pension reform, and also looking at the de facto for growth. infrastructures, long delayed in italy, we have simplified the process of building infrastructures and injected in acceleration on those. then the functioning of the markets and that we have introduced more competition for example, in the leader of professions, like to call themselves -- but many pressures to become liberal. and in the separation between gas production and gas distribution, to give you another example. all in the shopping hours and the commerce sector. also a lot of significant indication concerning -- of course this needs to be continued and one issue about the italian elections in which i will not go unless -- here today is which political configuration is more in line with the need to sustain these structures. but i believe that -- not even the largest countries can reall
historic when we accomplish it. that is to start the work on a u.s. e.u. trans-atlantic trade that investment or airship to grow prosperity on both sides of the atlantic. it is no secret that we both faced economic challenges. we all do in this new marketplace, and a global challenge the marketplace. the fact is that europe freestanding aloud is the largest economy in the world and when you join that together with the united states of america, we have a powerful ability to be able to affect the rules of the road and to be able to raise standards and most importantly create jobs for all of our people. europe is already america's largest trading partner. a disagreement will create more jobs for additional investment and nasty note earlier this month, president obama made it clear this is a top priority for the united states. we also discussed the responsibility that we share to support fragile democracies across the world, across the monograph from libya to tunisia and beyond. i say to our friends here in the united kingdom, it is in our mutual interest to see that these fledgli
that perhaps is even more fundamentally dangerous for britain and much of the rest of europe than taming the e.u.'s superstate tendencies. this is the problem of attitudes and how the institutional expression in the economy. because as i illustrate in "becoming europe" the prevailing conviction across most of europe is that the state is the primary way in which we address common problems and meet our responsibilities and obligations to our fellow citizens. that such obligations might be realized outside the realm of politics doesn't apparently occurred to large numbers of european political leaders including i have to say a considerable number of the center-right european politicians. so in this regard i have often wondered what -- would think if he read a particularly important book that was written 180 years ago by one of his compatriots. because although it's about the new world, democracy in america was sent written for an american audience. alexis de tocqueville's intended audience was europe. so i think you would be astonished to learn how the americans observed by de tocqueville dealt with p
are subject to review by scientists at regulatory agencies. the 2008 eu risk assessment for this chemical which is using all the best information available concludes that tdcpp gives no reason for concern to human health. n relation to its physic chemical -- health in relation to its physic chemical properties. couch manufacturers are mandated by law to use the flame retardants in the tomorrow stuffing. it's a little known law in southern california known as technical bulletin 117 which says the couch must be able to stand exposure to a small flame for 12 seconds without igniting. while the regulation applies only to california, manufacturers use it in all their products instead of jreat the west coast. >> that's what's left of a couch after a couple minutes of burning. >> it's a huge concern for firefighters according to dave cope, fire marshal for the city of laurel. >> i believe fire retardant is good. i just believe they should use safe chemicals that doesn't affect the breathing of anybody that's involved in before or after or during a fire that, they should find other methods to mak
in place which is as per our constitution. that has 60 to 0eu9 days to run that election so the incumbents are not able to influence the outcome and we are on time and on course for that. >> sit having any effect on the peace process [inaudible] >> i mean as i said, they are running its peace process. pakistan is running pakistan right now. but we will certainly assist in the peace process and required. the foreign office will remain engaged. all the centers through the election, i think everybody will remain engaged. we are now two months into a run up but we are constantly engaged in this process so i don't see it becoming a victim of our election. at the end of the day it is a peace process. >> i just wanted to first follow up a little bit on jonathan's question if i could get to you clarify a little bit. the afghans and the americans have complained that thus far those who have been released have been very low down on the list of what they've been asking for and they haven't been released as requested directly to the h.b.c. but have just been released. you said that when asked about br
move in a couple of weeks to, i hope, the negotiations on the e.u. budget. .. in the last 12 months, we have come back to the market. can you tell us a little bit more about the structural economic reforms. particularly repairing the banking system, which i feel is the exemption of growth. >> yes, two years ago when the administration was elected, it actually lasted 250,000 jobs for the two years prior to that. reputation is in shreds around the world. our banks are dysfunctional. there is a complete sense of hopelessness and despair and disillusionment. now, gordon was elected with a very keen mind. we have a strategy and a plan that works. the banks are being recapitalize and restructured and have been back in the market as this program began in 2013. there are double-digit figures and our people have had to take really serious challenges. his government made really serious decisions or if it is an example of the government works and understands the patience of people, putting up with these changes in the greater picture of things. now, we expect to do better. but we cannot do without
later on and specifically in western and northwestern africa mauritania is generally considered by the e.u. in the less problematic state. the number of youth recruited remains very small and the attacks carried on the soil the capabilities are extremely limited and its affiliated networks are disorganized and weak today. it pursues the and imprisonment of a violent extremists as disrupting the growth of the militant movement. but like other countries are faced with a challenge of ensuring control of the borders. i mean, it shows ilana border on the 2,400 kilometers. it is even more than algeria which shares 1300 kilometers border. he. it's all forms of smuggling and also as i said, slipping in the northern mali to mauritania and he. the aggressive approach to fight the violent extremists and it's definitely more so than mali. an example because it has equipped its airports with i.t. systems. it has installed passport readers and it's about 27 posts to control its borders with help , and it has trained hundreds of the police officers. the government has also undertaken several initiatives
in western and north western africa. they are considered or seen by the e.u., france, as the least problematic state of the sierra. the number of youth recruited into al-qaeda so far remains very small, and they attack on soil, lack sophistication. capabilities are extremely limited, and it's affiliated networks are disorganized and weak today. the government's aggressive pursuit and imprisonment pursuit of violence extremists temporarily disrupted the growth, but like other countries, niger, are faced with the challenge of ensuring control over the borders. i mean, mori tan ya shares a long border with mali, 2240 kilometers. it's even more than algeria which it shares 1300 kilometers a border with mali. border management plays a key role in counter in all forms of smuggling and, also, as i said the fighters in northern mali, so they have adopted an aggressive approach to fight violent extremists, more than the neighbors, definitely more than mali. for example, they equipped its airport, three airports with i.t. systems. it has full passport readers, it has built 27 # -- 27 posts t
with asean, singapore, japan and korea. and we're also in dialogue with the eu. we have been talking about a bilateral investment treaty, but not necessarily with a due sense of urgency. for meeting since negotiations started in 2007 does not suggest a great deal of haste. much as it might surprise, we want this as much as you did because it is also of interest to us. ladies and gentlemen, important as they are, market access issues, and goods and services, and i to be seen perspective for they can be made to define narrative. why we must work to sort out these challenges, it is not in our interest to let such issues define the relationship. this is why we have proposed to create an ad hoc clearinghouse mechanism to discuss market access issues in the trade policy forum. i believe that we also need to find a new positive narrative that can bind our countries closer together. one such opportunity i feel is in the energy sector. without a shirt access to energy inputs in sufficient quantities, we will not be able to sustain our economic development. therefore, an enduring in the u.s. partner
with the eu. not necessarily with a decent of urgency. it does not suggest a great deal of pace. it may surprise you that we want this as much as you do. ladies and gentlemen, important as they are, services can be seen in perspective " for be made of the defining narrative. while we must sort out these challenges, it is not in our interest to define racial profiling. we will discuss market access issues at the trade policy forum. we also need to find a positive narrative that will bind our countries together. one is in the energy sector. without access to energy inputs, we will not be able to sustain economic development. therefore, an enduring partnership should not only cover technological and regulatory aspects, but established commercial partnerships. as the u.s. becomes a net exporter of energy, we hope we can develop mutually beneficial partnerships. renewable energy, biofuels and emission technologies. in each of these cases, there can be immediate benefits for both sides. you're interested in exporting natural gas and exporting to non fta countries would help stabilize internat
as a terrorist organization. the second thing, in 2006 you were one of 12 senators who refused to position the e.u. to identify hezbollah as a terrorist group. third, in november of twee, you failed to -- 2003, you failed to vote on a syrian accountability act with sanctions -- occupation of lebanon. four, in 2001, you were one of only two senators that year to vote against renewal of the iran-libya sanctions act. and lastly, in 2001, you were one of four senators who refused to sign the letter supporting israel. are those accurate? >> well, let's start with the -- >> no. i just want to know if the statement -- these are votes that took place. do you agree those votes took place? >> i want to ask the letter that you just noted in your fifth point, what was the date in the letter? >> the date. >> you said i refused to sign letter. >> october of 2001. >> a letter to -- >> ok. skip that one. is the other ones true? >> well, it was fairly important -- >> it's very important. i was holding the letter at the time that we were gathering signatures. >> i see. on the 2008 question regarding designating the
nominee that refused to sign letters supporting israel and, refused to sign a letter asking the eu to designate hezbollah as a terrorist organization and the list goes on and on and on but at the end of the day, this is the president's decision, i give him great discretion and can't believe one democratic colleague is not upset by this choice, enough to speak out. >> chris: now, one of the other things you want and you are using the nomination as leverage, is to get more information about benghazi, the president says that that is all about politics. take a look at this: >> president barack obama: we've had more testimony and more paper provided to congress than ever before, and, congress is sort of running out of things to ask. >> chris: question, tell me the single most important thing that after all of these months you still don't know about benghazi. >> pretty hard. let's start with after. we don't know who changed the talking points to take the references to al qaeda, or the talking points given to susan rice and don't know who the survivors of the attack are so congress can in
's some talks coming up now in kazakhstan of all places in late february involving the eu, the united states and the iranians. and so this is going to be a venue in which people are going to be able to see to a certain extent how serious iran is about negotiating on limits on its nuclear program. there hasn't been negotiations for some significant period of ti. and this is an opportunity to test the iranians. i think this initial round is not going to prove much but certainly over the next six months, i think there will be an ample opportunity to see if there is an intent on the iranian part to reach some sort of compromise. >> rose: leon panetta and others have said the following. we have no information that there's been a decision on the part of the iranian government and the most influential people there to builds a nuclear weapon and a missile that will deliver it. what do they mean when they say that? >> well, i can't really speak for them but i think it's pretty clear that iran has made the decision to have a nuclear weapons program. and there's really nothing el that explains
and afghanistan by introducing weapons systems and training. bulgaria is now going to the eu to try to get at least some tougher sanctions on hezbollah through iran because of their attempt -- they attempted to kill the saudi ambassador in washingt washington, d.c. >> if the president means what he has said repeatedly and clearly, nuclear iran means war with the united states. the president has said that he does not endorse containment of iran. they will not have, he said, nuclear weapons. if they cross that threshold, there must be some red line somewhere that means war with iran. >> i mean, there are other options to war. >> i think the worst possible scenario would be a nuclear-armed iran, i think that has to be stopped. by any and all measures. >> which the president has pledged to do. >> which he has. i think we need to work in consultation with our european allies to make sure that that doesn't happen. they have been bad players straight-on. they're not negotiating in my opinion in good faith. i think we have to understand that. >> the real question is, what to do? we can talk about
, but not much more than that. the eu is providing non-legal aid, i am wondering if the u.s. is considering this? and if you are ceding influence for the ron. afghanistan has asked u.s. troops to leave the province and i think within two weeks, can we get your comment on that? >> with respect to afghanistan, i understand the concerns they have expressed. appropriately, when a complaint they may have thought to be appropriately evaluated. they will be, i assure you. i have taken appropriate note and i have had a great deal of involvement in afghanistan with president karzai. there are evaluations of how things might have gone wrong or might have changed. we are working on a bilateral security arrangement and this transition process. we have had a very good conversation with the president. president obama talked to him before making announcements. we have listened very carefully to his observations about wanting to speed up the transition with respect to management of security. i can assure you that we are finely attuned to the needs of the afghan people, and the most effective ways to make this t
of government. and the times of london picked up on this piece. a new plan for the eu. the big international news is that the president announced 34,000 troops in afghanistan will come home in a year. >> tonight i can announce that over the next year, another 34,000 american troops will come home from afghanistan. this drawdown will continue and by the end of next year or war in afghanistan will be over. [ applause ] >> i want to bring in richard engel. welcome to both of you. >> nice to be here. again, second in a row. >> let's talk about foreign affairs that had been telegraphed by the white house. he talked about afghanistan, a very brief mention of the middle east. what kind of reaction are you hearing across this part of the world? >> not a great reaction. not much reaction at all. he barely mentioned the middle east. i think people in the middle east had been look iing for a little bit more u.s. leadership on syria. and there's a recognition in the region that syria is a black hole that could suck the other countries into. it. and all the president said was, we continue to oppose assad
. this is something that is totally in line with the e.u. inspiration of social market economy, and we are lead by, first of all securing the sustainability of public finances in the long-term, including a pension reform, and also looking at the de facto for growth. infrastructures, long delayed in italy, we have simplified the process of building infrastructures and injected in acceleration on those. then the functioning of the markets and that we have introduced more competition for example, in the leader of professions, like to call themselves -- but many pressures to become liberal. and in the separation between gas production and gas distribution, to give you another example. all in the shopping hours and the commerce sector. also a lot of significant indication concerning -- of course this needs to be continued and one issue about the italian elections in which i will not go unless -- here today is which political configuration is more in line with the need to sustain these structures. but i believe that -- not even the largest countries can really keep a momento for growth or resume a momen
nutrition, be well fed and a safe food supply. it is an honor to may pa*eu -- pay tribute to those at kansas state university, to make sure it remains a place of higher education and learning in our state, but also to make certain that kansas state university, manhattan, kansas, is always that place called home, where students from across our state and around the globe feel like they found a family and a place to learn and improve their lives and to make certain that they contribute to the betterment of our world. it's an honor to be here with one of the most distinguished alumnus of kansas state university, my colleague and friend, senator roberts, to wish that kansas state university many more years of success in providing education to our students and moving our state forward in ways that will only benefit not only this generation but those that follow us. so congratulations, can -- kansas state university. happy 150th birthday. mr. president, i yield back to the senator from kansas. mr. roberts: i thank my dear friend and colleague more specially for highlighting what k-state is all abou
asking the e.u. designates hezbollah as a terrorist organization. >> reporter: graham called him one most unqualified, radical choices for secretary of defense in a long time, jenna. jenna: those comments out there. the obama administration not too happy about the comments and the process being held up. what is the administration saying about why it need the new national security team now? >> reporter: keep in mind the smart considering nominations for new secretary of defense. a nominee for cia director. president's new white house chief of staff offered this reminder we live in a dangerous world. >> between john brennan, the cia director and chuck hagel as secretary of defense we want to make sure we have those guys sitting in the chairs working because i don't want there to be something missed because of this hang up here in washington. >> reporter: you won't see action this week due to the president's day recess but capitol hill sources say the hagel nomination will be likely taken up a week from tomorrow. jenna: we'll watch that, mike, thank you. >> reporter: thank you. jon: for more
an eye on the meeting of finance minsters from the 17 eu countrys that use the euro. taking a live look at the big board, the dow is down 30. the nasdaq is down 6. s&p down 2. >>> apple could soon come out with something new. the new york times says apple is testing a new device that's worn like a watch. the paper says the device is made of glass and runs on a mobile operating system. analysts say apple products already have fashion appeal so the idea of wearing an apple product is not much of a stretch. >>> australian lawmakers want to know why their citizens must pay so much for iphones, ipads. an iphone that sells for $500 in the u.s. costs $540 there despite the australian dollar being worth than the u.s. dollar. >>> 7:45. well, an investigation by san francisco city attorneys into how some city employees used city computers should wrap up soon. the p.u.c. is working with the district attorney to investigate that several work employees used the computers to download pornography and gamble online. the inappropriate use of looking at explicitly sexual materials and gambling online can
because countries in the eu or even the euro zone are very, very different to what germany or portugal or greece or italy to the east, it's a very, very different situation, in that, that means we need also all a bit of time, education, infrastructure investment, all this is needed so that they have, let's say, a growth perspective for the next years. >> thank you. take another round of questions. >> [inaudible] >> the federal reserve hester medical increased its balance sheet since the great recession. about 20, 30 years, it didn't very all that much. suddenly very large increase. is the federal reserve comfortable in that it has an exit strategy so that we don't have either major inflation -- [inaudible] or major losses from purchasing assets and resale trying to bring back this money. thank you. >> a very quick to comment. [inaudible] i'm very happy to american colleagues. i think that we in europe -- [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] >> and in the back. did you have your hand up? >> that's what we do. any other questions? okay. is the one back you? >> i'm not an economist. i'm a
by regulation under the legislation, and then we have e.u. sanctions. >> right. >> and, indeed, sanctions that other people follow that are mandated by the security council. the e.u. seems to be, on this issue, potentially more flexible than we are. and so there is operating room there. there is operating room in not putting more sanctions on that could be helpful as an initial step. and, obviously, that would be important. each one of these the president would have to explain that he's getting value. that the europeans could take sanctions off central banks and petroleum, for example. that we could do things that i think are absolutely necessary. we have had a longstanding policy of not sanctioning food and medicine for good reasons. and when i was in the security council, the first sanctions on iraq after their invasion of kuwait we made it scrupulously careful. that got all screwed up in oil for food. and i don't want to spend time here talking about that, but -- >> many. [inaudible] >> that was a perfect example of how things could go wrong. but the fundamental basis was the right bas
sanctions is by legislation, under the legislation, and then we have the e.u. sanctions and others that people follow mandated by the security council. the e.u. seems to be more flexible than we are, so there is operating room there. there is operating room in not putting more sanctions on the table could be helpful as an initial step. that would be important. each one of these the president would have to explain he is getting value, that the europeans to take sanctions off central banks and petroleum. that we could do things that i think are absolutely necessary. we have had a longstanding policy of not sanctioning food and medicine for good reasons, and when i was in the security council, in iraq we made them carefully. that got screwed up in oil for food, and i do not want to talk about that, but that was an example of how things could go wrong. the basis was the right basis and that even in the worst of all possible situations, you cannot punish the population, particularly, for the sins of their leaders, especially if they did not choose the leaders. we have a situation where
department focused on energy diplomacy as well as new partnerships like the u.s. e.u. energy council we work intensively with the iraqis to support their energy sector because it is critical not only to their economy but their stability as well. we have significantly intensifiintensifi ed efforts to resolve energy disputes from the south china sea to the eastern mediterranean to keep the world's energy market stable. now this has been helped quite significantly by the increase in our own domestic production. it's no accident that is as the iranian oil has gone off-line because of our sanctions other sources have come on line so iran cannot in a fit from increased prices. then there is human rights and our support for democracy and the rule of law. levers of power and values we cannot afford to ignore. in the last century the united states where it led the world in recognizing universal rights exist and that governments are obligated to protect them. now we have placed ourselves at the frontline of today's emerging battle like the fight to defend the human rights of the lgbt communities aroun
refused to position the e.u. to identify hezbollah as a terrorist group. third, in november of twee, you failed to -- 2003, you failed to vote on a syrian accountability act with sanctions -- occupation of lebanon. four, in 2001, you were one of only two senators that year to vote against renewal of the iran-libya sanctions act. and lastly, in 2001, you were one of four senators who refused to sign the letter supporting israel. are those accurate? >> well, let's start with the -- >> no. i just want to know if the statement -- these are votes that took place. do you agree those votes took place? >> i want to ask the letter that you just noted in your fifth point, what was the date in the letter? >> the date. >> you said i refused to sign letter. >> october of 2001. >> a letter to -- >> ok. skip that one. is the other ones true? >> well, it was fairly important -- >> it's very important. i was holding the letter at the time that we were gathering signatures. >> i see. on the 2008 question regarding designating the revolutionary guard as a terrorist organization, i did vote against it. >> i
works. now when you work on a problem like this, as we do in the u.s., perhaps not at the scale the e.u. will, we'll find out. you learn not only more things about the brain but you learn how to build better computers and circles around and all boats rise. but the one mess age i want to leave with you with is that basic research still done in universities primarily including this new world of use inspired basic research with good interaction with companies and so forth producing the independenceble feed stock for companies and especially for young entrepreneurial companies that increasingly drive innovation, products, and jobs. mr. chairman, rajing member johnson, thank you for the opportunity to be here. i'll be happy to answer any questions. >> thank you. thank you for your testimonies today. i'll recognize myself for five minutes to ask questions and mr. templeton i would like to address my first question to you. let me preface by saying this in the united states every year $400 billion is spend on research and development. about $140 billion comes from the federal government. those
. tell your story about how family and medical leave has helped you, how much more eu could have been helped had not had the financial stresses that i am sure exist in families when they have to take unpaid leave. asked them both to amend the family and medical leave so more people can take it for more reasons and how much you need paid leaves. host: what exactly is a national partnership? caller: we are a national advocacy group that works on access to quality health care, that works on issues like workplace fairness and to ensure workers can be responsible family members. this is why we are advocates for expanding medical leave. it it is a labor of love for us to help working families secure the health care they need. we are a nonprofit organization that receives donations that are tax deductible from foundations and individuals. host: you can go to their web site nationalpartnerships.org. caller: i want, i think it is great the work you have done. it is great you're able to use that. about 10 years ago i had a 16 year old daughter that had a dui. i found that she was involved in dr
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)

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